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Chase the Economy but Don’t Lose Sight of Immigration

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I want to elaborate on something Elias touches on in his recent Salon piece. Declaring the Republican Party paralyzed by their on strategy of obstructionist nihilism, Elias explains,

Cut to yesterday, more than two years later, and depressingly little has changed. There Obama stands; still president, still trying, and still finding no serious partner with whom to bargain. But whereas the original grand bargain was truly sweeping in its ambitions, trading (too few) tax hikes for (too many) cuts to social insurance programs like Medicare and Social Security, this latest iteration of what some have called the president’s white whale is far more modest. And yet Republican resistance is, if anything, even firmer.”

The only explanation for this continued behavior that makes any sense to me is that Republicans are just trying to prevent themselves from being challenged on the right during the upcoming primaries for 2014.

Which shouldn’t be surprising after four years of calling the President a socialist radical who may or may not be a secret Muslim terrorist and is almost certainly an angry Black man who has no allegiance to REAL Americans. How can you strike a Grand Bargain if that’s whose sitting across from you?

In a sense then, this feels like a classic case of being forced to lie in the beds Republicans made for themselves. Of course, this doesn’t mean all Republicans. As we should all be well aware, the party is as divided as ever.

The two apparent front-runners for 2016 at the moment (at least in terms of who the media has chosen to focus on) are both conservative black sheep. What does it say about the Republicans when their two leading men are slinging mud at each other over foreign policy dovishness and federal aid to state governments?

And many Republicans are breaking ranks with their leaders well before the fall’s battle to shut down the government. A betrayal that Marco Rubio finds rather “discouraging.”

My political instincts (which are poor and dull), tell me the only way to effectively meet this challenge is for Democrats to focus on the economy and immigration. Good political spin coming out of a game of chicken over the budget isn’t going to make up for low turnout during the mid-terms. If Democrats want to put Republicans on the defense going into 2014, they need to keep immigration reform at the center of their legislative agenda.

They’ll have plenty of time to pay lip-service to jobs and re-investment with the Republicans picking fights over Obamacare and taxes, but without meaningful action on immigration, including forcing the Republicans to continue fracturing internally over the issue, simply crowing about how Republicans won’t work with the President on the economy isn’t going to be enough.

 

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13 thoughts on “Chase the Economy but Don’t Lose Sight of Immigration

  1. My political instincts are telling me we are experiencing why highly ideologically and partisan parties are not good under a system based on separation of powers.

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    • Your political instincts are dumb and deaf.
      It is the refusal to compromise that dooms the state.
      Gingrich was plenty ideological and partisan,
      but like a good statesman, was willing to come to the table
      in good faith.

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  2. Declaring the Republican Party paralyzed by their on strategy of obstructionist nihilism, Elias explains,

    Again, the Republican congressional caucus is under no obligation to assist the President with his tar babies. If they want Mr. Boehner’s help with fiscal consolidation, they have to meet him somewhere near halfway.

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      • I am afraid that with separation of powers, bicameralism, and the Senate’s parliamentary rules, that’s baked in the cake for just about anyone. Make’s no sense to refer to the Republican caucus as ‘nihilistic’ due to that. But you knew that.

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    • Huh…i had thought simplifying the tax code was a repub goal. So was fixing the immigration problem. Oh well i guess those are just Dem issues so therefore the R’s have no obligation to do anything about them.

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      • I would say Mr. McCain and Mr. King have different conceptions about what it means to ‘fix’ the immigration problem. Simplifying the tax code is a goal of many Republicans. Too bad the President has no interest in that.

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      • Ummm yeah Art…simplifying the tax code doesn’t mean cutting rates and eliminating loopholes…gotcha…that makes sense. Fixing immigration apparently doesn’t mean finding a way to make the immigrants here legal in some way and making the system work so there is less illegal immigration…right sure. Or to just cut to the chase…meeting R’s halfway means just doing what they want.

        Compromise usually means both sides get something they want.

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    • Perhaps you should have a friend explain the legal complications of the debt ceiling re: budget, taxes.

      Although I do support the 14th Amendment, and therefor the right and duty of the president in that respect.

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  3. Pingback: Chase the Economy but Don’t Lose Sight of Immigration | ApplyCitizen.com

  4. Well, Republicans are naturally going to be divided over immigration. Many business leaders want immigration reform to depress wages and make hiring and firing easier. But most Republicans are not business leaders, they’re workers who don’t want to see their wages fall due to increased competition from a labor pool expanded with millions of new immigrants who will work for almost nothing, or would rather work with poor and minorities who do speak English rather than ones who don’t.

    The Democrats don’t have any reason to be divided because the new voters will help invigorate their electoral success, and poor and minorities are used to being really poor and unemployed anyway. It keeps them loyal.

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    • “But most Republicans are not business leaders, they’re workers who don’t want to see their wages fall due to increased competition from a labor pool expanded with millions of new immigrants who will work for almost nothing, or would rather work with poor and minorities who do speak English rather than ones who don’t.”

      The joke is that you’re basically accusing the rank and file Republican of being racist, because they’re happy to support everything else which lowers wages.

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