Breaking Down the Father on BBC Being Interrupted by His Children

The most important thing to notice about this quite nice home office, particularly for Asia (it’s really big!), is the stack of books on the bed over Kelly’s left shoulder. As should be rather obvious, those books aren’t there by accident! Kelly almost certainly placed them there for this interview; sadly, given the terrible compression applied to Twitter video, I have no idea what books they are, but rest assured they are very befitting Kelly’s position as Professor of Political Science at Pusan National University and BBC expert on South Korea.

The map on the wall is also a nice touch: this is a man who almost certainly knows his way around the globe, but a blank wall just doesn’t play well on TV.

There are two flaws, though, in Kelly’s premeditated presentation: one, the door is ajar. Obviously that will figure prominently. Two, on the left hand side of the screen something is intruding into the picture. I have no idea what it is; it’s just an excuse to explain that these interviews are done using the webcam in computer displays. It’s true! There is no cameraperson there; indeed, often you are looking into the camera and seeing nothing on your own screen. It’s really disorienting and honestly one of the reasons I don’t like doing these kinds of TV hits.

From: Breaking Down the Father on BBC Being Interrupted by His Children – Medium

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10 thoughts on “Breaking Down the Father on BBC Being Interrupted by His Children

    • I saw a million think pieces and then think pieces on think pieces and think pieces on think pieces on think pieces and all I could think was, “We don’t have nearly enough information to draw any sorts of conclusions about any of the people in the video.” And somehow this seemed to be an extreme minority position.

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  1. …often you are looking into the camera and seeing nothing on your own screen. It’s really disorienting and honestly one of the reasons I don’t like doing these kinds of TV hits.

    I have never seen this type of application that didn’t include a local video window, at least as an option. Heck, the prototype software that I wrote almost a quarter-century ago — sounds more impressive than 24 years — provided a local video window despite the painful computational cost* because they’re unusable without that feature.

    * When all of the video decoding is being done in software on a 50 MHz 486 processor, an extra window is painful. As opposed to today: sitting here on my desk is a Raspberry Pi Zero, with a 1 GHz processor and built-in GPU that does all the video stuff, and cost me $5. The HDMI cable to connect the thing to a monitor costs more than all of that processing power.

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  2. Apparently the to-do was people assumed the woman who came in to fetch the children was the nanny, not the wife. Follow up with usual accusations of bias at various levels of consciousness and counter-accusations about who the REAL racists are.

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  3. I analyzed as a comedy bit (which is wasn’t planned as, of course) in a Twitter conversation with Brother Scotto:

    The key is how it builds. Swaggering toddler is hilarious, but then it’s topped by baby cruising around in walker. The next logical step is poodle walking in on its hind legs, but that’s too silly to fit the narrative. The other way to go is sit the girls on his lap and include them. “Do we like Kim Jong-un, Susie?” “No, he’s a big meanie!”

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