Text Patterns: accelerationism and myth-making

There’s a great deal to mull over there, but one of the chief thoughts I take away from my reading is this: the influence of fiction, cinema, and music over all these developments is truly remarkable — or, to put it another way, I’m struck by the extent to which extremely smart and learned people find themselves imaginatively stimulated primarily by their encounters with popular culture. All these interrelated movements seem to be examples of trickle-up rather than trickle-down thinking: from storytellers and mythmakers to formally-credentialed intellectuals. This just gives further impetus to my effort to restock my intellectual toolbox for (especially) theological reflection.

From: Text Patterns: accelerationism and myth-making

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14 thoughts on “Text Patterns: accelerationism and myth-making

  1. We will push the human race forward no matter how many billions have to die in the process of reaching utopia.

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    • Utopian thinking can certainly be dangerous, but then so can complacency. Every economic, social and political idea we have was a new one at some point, and if you get into the habit of condemning every attempt to change the world for the better you may end up missing something important. I’m sure there were any number of people who thought the Founding Fathers were making a huge mistake by rejecting tried-and-true monarchism for some utopian experiment with democracy.

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      • My objection is not to new ideas or their implementation but using people as things to implement said ideas and not stopping to see if your implementation is causing more suffering than necessary. People as groups or individuals should not have to be blood sacrifices on the alter of progress varyingly defined. How you implement the ideas are just as important as what ideas you are implementing.

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  2. This is exactly like when Harry told Hermione that they needed to use Quidditch tactics against Voldemort.

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  3. Wait, is he saying that telling stories based on extrapolating technological and cultural trends is some sort a new thing?

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  4. Ha ha, I’m not at all surprised to see Warren Ellis cited there. He wrote a short novel recently, “Normal”, which is basically about the kind of derangements you get when people think about the future too hard. It’s pretty good, a sort of horror story that Kimmie’s friends would write (although nothing about methane clathrates as far as I could tell.)

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    • DD,
      My friend writes quite highly regarded horror stories, yes.
      The lonely assassins should ring a bell, no?
      (Please to draw connections that i Did Not Actually say).

      (Although more relevant is his work on Katawa Shoujo, exploring how disabled children might escape realities through the use of the internet and alternative personas).

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