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First Monday 2014

Same cast, brand new season! Burt Likko offers a look at some of the high points of the Supreme Court’s docket for the 2014-2015 Term.

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Zora Neale Hurston: An American Story

A collaborative post by Chris and Burt Likko, telling the story of an American writer who deserves to be better-known and better-read.

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The Price Of Citizenship (Updated)

New Mexico’s Supreme Court ruled today in favor of a plaintiff who sued for violation of one of that state’s anti-discrimination laws based on a photographer refusing to take pictures at her same-sex commitment ceremony. Burt Likko presents a digest of the decision.

Bernstein on Discrimination and Liberty

If you’re not reading Cato Unbound — also known as my real job — you should be. Here’s David Bernstein, offering some new thinking on the old debate between property rights and nondiscrimination: Historically, many of the leading advocates of civil rights for African Americans in the late 19th and early 20th century—for example, Moorfield…

Race and homeownership, continued

A few months ago, I recommended Jason Kuznicki’s excellent article on America’s history of state-sanctioned racial discrimination. In it, Kuznicki discusses the relationship between government regulations and social prejudice (emphasis mine): In a mobile and egalitarian commercial republic influenced by Christianity, practicing racism ought to be difficult. It becomes much easier, however, when there are…

Broken Windows Theory of Discrimination

(cross-posted from my humble blog) To sort of second Neil’s observation about the power of anti-bullying/anti-prejudice norms to “have a broad and beneficial societal impact,” I’m pretty convinced that you can apply the “broken windows” theory of crime to overt prejudice and the treatment of minority groups.  That is, and as I’m sure you all…

Why Care about Affirmative Action?

Via Ta-Nehisi Coates comes this piece by Pat Buchanan that centers around the following allegation: Sotomayor got into Princeton, got her No. 1 ranking, was whisked into Yale Law School and made editor of the Yale Law Review — all because she was a Hispanic woman. And those two Ivy League institutions cheated more deserving…