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In Defense of Poetry

Old poetry is laden with the baggage of centuries of hidden metaphor and archaic references. New poetry is prone to abstraction and whimsical laziness. But poetry deserves our consideration as an art form nonetheless. After all, all the music we love is poetry, and all the fun little things we can do with language are best done in poetic form.

Driving Blind: The Humanities Die and Superman Returns

Digby argues that MSNBC’s ratings aren’t down because of quality issues, but rather that a large part of its liberal base is currently alienated and indifferent. Some are defending the humanities against digital aggression, or something, while others continue to tout the value of dreams, and falling them, and so on. It’s still graduation season,…

Driving Blind: Liberal Imperialism Was so Much Cooler in the 80s

I’ve linked to some of Leopold Lambert’s architecture posts in the past. Cameron Kunzelman’s been reading his book, Weaponized Architecture, and gives a great, brief over view of it. Carrie Brownstein, courtesy of the Awl, tells us how American Express has made her addiction to vinyls financially feasible. It’s also sponsored content from American Express. The advertorial…

Bread & Circuses: A mini-review of Mockingjay by Suzanne Collins

I finished the third installment of The Hunger Games last night, Mockingjay, by Suzanne Collins, and my goodness what a read. All three books are absurdly intense page-turners bound to keep one up far past one’s appropriate bedtime. If you are married and both spouses are reading these at the same time, prepare for some…

Dragonlance

“This book was one of my earliest introductions to fantasy and thus to the limits (or lack of limits) of the imagination. I read Dragonlance before I read Tolkien, and was just amazed by the bigness of the world. All I wanted for my tenth birthday was to swing my sword like Caramon, and get…

The Art of Magic in Fiction: An Interview with Lev Grossman

Fantasy is a genre dominated by sword-and-sorcery epics, mysterious dragons, and tyrannical sorcerers.  Few fantasy novels have joined the ranks of ‘great’ literature, and fewer still have crossed over into the contemporary literature aisle.  The Lord of the Rings has of course become iconic, and the Harry Potter books were inexplicably popular among non-fantasy readers. But when…

Real Fantasy

I stumbled across this short essay from February by Richard Morgan whose book, The Steel Remains, I am currently reading.  (And it’s good so far, and very dark, and very adult.)  Anyways, Morgan takes on Tolkien and offers up some pretty strong criticism of his Rings books.  Discussing a scene of dialog between two orcs,…