A Vast Silence

The New York Times ran a story that took Burt Likko’s breath away in outrage when he read it last night. But apparently, he’s pretty much the only one.

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The Right Path, Part II: Nate Silver and the Delegitimisation of Traditional Journalism and Objective Data

“Data that contradicts the Ideology is a lie; institutions that publish such data are the enemy; those individuals who consider such data are heretics.”

Human life is not too controversial

The rhetorical case for protecting the unborn has succeeded. The debate is over.  It would be, that is, had the Supreme Court not issued – in Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s own words – a “difficult to justify,” “heavy-handed judicial intervention” in Roe v. Wade 40 years ago.  Today, nearly two-thirds of Americans support making abortion generally illegal after the first three months of pregnancy.  A staggering four-fifths support bans in the last three months.  So if the pro-choice movement is […]

Sailing Away to Irrelevance, Epilogue: In Which the GOP is Finally and Inevitably Made Irrelevant

Two weeks ago, while almost no one was watching, Rick Santorum and the conservative media pulled off an historic, astounding and quite literal coup.  They did this with the tiniest of acts: organizing to kill US participation in a small and innocuous United Nations treaty.  The treaty itself was not historic; indeed, it was mind-numbingly…

Sports Media And (Incredibly Mild) Critique Is Making Me So Low

Hope Solo is angry. Although her team had won 3-0 today against an undersized Colombia, Brandi Chastain, an NBC commentator for the match, had criticized one of the team’s defenders. Solo, who counts on those defenders, wanted to make something clear: color commentators are there to approvingly praise American players. They are not to offer…

Depicting Christians

Over at the Atlantic, Eleanor Barkhorn complains that the closeted young Christian characters of Blue Like Jazz depict rather than shatter stereotypes about evangelical Christians in the movies. For her, the promise of the movie was to present a positive, nuanced, and lifelike view of Christians in the real world and instead resorts to many of the…

On “Truth” and Its Consequences – Why We Need A New Business Model for 21st Century Journalism

On January 6, NPR’s This American Life aired an hour long and fairly damning segment on the working conditions of the Chinese manufacturing workers that build Apple products. To say the show got some attention would be an understatement. Within a few weeks it had become TAL’s most downloaded episode – quite an achievement for…

Attention Conservatives: This is why the correct answer was always, “What he said was inexcusable.”

And why it was never, ever, “slut,” “prostitute,” “whore,” Flake,” “she didn’t mind having things stuck up there before she got pregnant,” or “hold the pill between your knees.” Fresh off two straight weeks of contraception hearings and the Limbaugh/Fluke hubbub, Obama now sits comfortably ahead of his only somewhat close rival, Romney.  One of…

Narrative Over Principle: The Perils of Believing Your Own Propaganda

I’ve not got a whole heck of a lot to add to this very good paragraph from Glenn Greenwald on the whole hubbub over the propriety of the Obama Administration’s entirely speculative suggestions (with the backing of Think Progress) that the Chamber of Commerce’s election ads are funded, at least in part, by foreign contributions:…

Andrew Sullivan spins and spins

In yet another misleading and emotionally driven post, Andrew Sullivan attempts to spin the decision to suspend the canonical trial of Father Lawrence Murphy into a cover-up by then Cardinal Ratzinger. This despite the fact the trial was suspended only when it was learned that the priest was nearing death and that a trial would…

Lament for a Dying Medium

It’s ‘Celebrate Old Media Day’ here at the League of Ordinary Gentlemen, and following Freddie on Gladwell on Free, I thought I’d chime in with my own appreciation for the news industry. Like Freddie, I’m not sure things are getting better, and I tend to think recent events bear this out. The revolution in Iran,…

on the fly vs fly on the wall

Scott is right, of course.  The blogging community functions more like a sawed off shotgun than one of these, even when we’re dealing with topics that are undoubtedly long range.  Some pieces might hit the mark, but a lot of them won’t.  Nevertheless, there is something good and valuable to this sort of approach that…

State of Print

Resting at the heart of  State of Play (2009) is not so much the personal relationships of the characters – who are mostly forgettable save for Crowe’s Cal McAffrey – or the grand (and oddly relevant) political conspiracy involving the Blackwater imitator PointCorp, but rather the struggle facing the newspaper itself.   McAffrey, a rugged, rough-around-the-edges…

what the Journolist kerfuffle suggests

This whole Journolist fracas that has been kicking around lately has again dredged up some of my suspicions about how the right really views the institutions they consider to be on the left. Look, I don’t think it’s a big secret that similar listserves exist for right-of-center commentariat types, and indeed, there are also investigative…