Virginia’s “Foolish” Personhood Law? A look under the hood

Via LoOG regular Mr. Gregniak: Virginia’s House of Delegates has just passed a fetal personhood law. Virginia’s Foolish Personhood Law DOUG MATACONIS · SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2012 · Virginia’s legislature was very busy last week. Not only did they pass a bill that will require every woman seeking an abortion to undergo an unnecessary and…

The Best Argument in Favor of Capital Punishment

Christopher Carr comments that “if we’re going to have capital punishment, we shouldn’t sugarcoat or whitewash it. We should have public gladiatorial competition or hangings with children in attendance. If we’re going to be barbarians, let’s at least be barbarians with balls. There’s a real deterrent right there.”  Indeed, it would be a deterrent.  But…

Air Force Ends 20-Year Nuclear Ethics Program

An interesting story broke a few days ago when truthout.org released an Air Force PowerPoint presentation used in an ethics training program given to its nuclear ballistics personnel.   The Air Force promptly withdrew the materials after truthout.org’s complaints of the citations to the Bible and other religious sources, as well as a quote from an…

Biology and Liberalism

Kevin Drum wonders: to the extent that you really do believe that cognitive abilities are (a) important, and (b) strongly biologically determined, shouldn’t you also believe that the poor are more unlucky than anything else, and haven’t done anything to deserve hunger, lousy housing, poor medical care, or crappy educations? If genetic luck plays a…

Consistency Check: Torture, Abortion, & the Individual Mandate

It’s easy to take an indignant moral position on a single issue.  “Torture is wrong.”  “Abortion is wrong.”  “Coerced transactions are wrong.”  Such positions aren’t rare, and thus not particularly interesting.  What is rare, however, is the ability to demonstrate consistency in taking several unequivocal moral positions.  That is, those who take an unequivocal moral…

Quote of the Day

Matt Zwolinski on Rand Paul equating universal health care with slavery: [P]erhaps it’s inevitable that politicians are going to badly over-simplify moral arguments.  And I suppose that if I had to choose, I’d much rather have a Senator who over-simplified in the direction of Murray Rothbard than, for instance, whatever moral philosopher Al Franken is…